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Knitting textures

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22 comments

  • mark

    Great stuff.  Looking forward to seeing more.  ( more, more, please, more :) )

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  • Samantha Bianchi

    I love the look of that teal swatch.

    Also, I know this an odd question but what is the paper binding you use along the tops? It seems like a convenient way to label things.

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  • OJ

    mark Thanks. I will post more in the future. :)

    Samantha Bianchi Thank you. The headers are cut up 14 in. x 17 in., 157 lb. vellum. I usually use plain 65 lb. cardstock, but I'm all out.

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  • Katy Grieve

    Beautiful samples OJ! Very inspiring to see your creations with the Kniterate :)

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  • OJ

    Katy Grieve Thank you!

    Posting a couple of mesh fabric test swatches, prime examples of things I rarely did on my own domestic machines, because they can be tedious so tedious. So much more fun on the Kniterate! The swatches use basic 1x1 transfers. I'm hoping that plasmatopia will post some of her amazing lace swatches and scarves (with more interesting transfers) here.

     

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Absolutely beautiful and great to see that we can do such great knits with the Kniterate Machine.  Can't wait till we can start sharing patterns when the software allows it.

     

     

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  • OJ

    Robert Ingemarsson Thank you! And yes, a good variety can be knitted. :)

    I've added the file and notes for the bottom swatch to Files from users.

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  • plasmatopia

    Hello!  I dream of creating knitwear on the Kniterate, but given my lack of experience, I am holding out for some templates to get me started.  But while I patiently await new developments with the software, I have been having fun with patterns and textures.  Much of what I have done thus far has been adapted from what I've seen in books on hand knitting. At OJ's suggestion, I will post photos of some of the swatches I've made with the Kniterate.

    In this post, I'll share a few variations on the theme of cardigan stitch, aka brioche stitch.  The first photo is basic two-color cardigan in off white and gray.  

    The wavy pattern below involves a few transfers and racks, making use of the needles that were unused in the basic version above.

    Next is front and back of a single color cardigan stitch swatch, experimenting with decreases of different types. 

    The one below is a two color swatch with the colors reversed for part of the sample, with front and back sides shown.

    In the next one, the upper part of the sample uses only half the needles, as in the samples above, but in the lower part I made the ridges twice as dense by using every needle.  The double density version was accomplished by racking the back bed 1/2 stitch, which allowed a tuck on the back bed between two knit stitches on adjacent needles on the front bed, or vice versa.

    When I get a chance, I'll make a few more posts with other types of stitches, including some of the lace ones.

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  • OJ

    plasmatopia I love hearing a llittle about the process and then seeing the knitted results! Thank you for posting. Looking forward to the next group, when you get the time. :)

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  • plasmatopia

    Here are a few lace examples, again selected mostly from books for hand knitters.  Generally the knitting is done on the front bed, and the pattern is made by selectively transferring stitches to the back bed and then racking before transferring back to the front.

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    plasmatopia Absolutely beautiful - your doing an amazing job in bringing those into the machine.  Would be great (if you wanted) to share those into the google drive 

     How long do they take you to bring into the software, and are you hitting problems with the software .  

    Are you using the machine bind-off for the switches?

     

    Gerard Rubio its great to see plasmatopia bringing these patterns into the software - Are there plans to be able to share such designs as templates in the new version of the software as having a community which can make and share patterns will be amazing.  If not, will we be able to export and then import patterns?

     

     

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  • OJ

    plasmatopia Such gorgeous stitches! Beautiful work!

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  • Emily Felix

    plasmatopia I would love it so much if you would be willing to share your command.kc file for the cardigan stitch in the Google share drive!

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  • Cadenzaclothes

    I love the rolls in the triple hem OJ! But how on earth did you do it? I've been trying to come up with a solution in the app but I'm stumped as to what happens to the extra rows on the front bed if you have stitches on both beds and only knit the front for several rows to create the roll. I can only envisage a pile-up on the front bed or all the stitches on the back bed breaking!

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  • OJ

    Cadenzaclothes Knit 4 rows on the FB, then 1 row on the BB. Roll distance for each FB row is one quarter the "normal" roll distance for the BB row. I repeated a couple more times before closing up the roll. A nice stretchy 100% wool is helpful.

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  • OJ

    Inspired by plasmatopia, I knitted my first multiple transfer lace. The stitch is Overlapping Waves from the hand knitting book Big Book of Knitting Stitch Patterns, originally published as Punti Della Maglia, edited by Ellen Liberles. I should have considered how many lines of instructions would be devoted to transfers and started with a longer panel size! Next time!

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  • Cadenzaclothes

    Thanks OJ - I will give it a try!

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  • OJ

    Cadenzaclothes After each complete ripple you may want to transfer all stitches to the FB to knit "spacers" for a few rows before beginning the next ripple. I'll post a screenshot in my folder on the group drive later today.

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  • OJ

    Inlay is possible! My backing yarn is 2 stitch sizes larger than for plain jersey. The inlay yarn is tiny at stitch size 2/2, but it never actually knits.

    I set up with a row of the backing yarn. The sequence begins with a pass of the inlay yarn tucking on the same bed that knits the backing, while using the opposite bed of needles to temporarily hold loops of the inlay yarn. The next row of backing yarn is knitted to lock in the inlay yarn. The last carriage pass in the sequence drops the temporary loops from the needles on the opposite bed creating the weaving effect.

    I would love to see this with elastic inlay every few rows. 

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  • LeBrie Rich

    These samples are amazing!! Thanks so much, OJ and plasmatopia for inspiring me and showing me what is possible with Kniterate!

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  • OJ

    LeBrie Rich :)  <3

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  • OJ

    This texture (pattern 60 from Knitting Lace by Susanna E. Lewis) is my first time introducing ribs into the lace. They added even more texture with this springy wool. Pictured is the swatch draped over my forearm. It's not a sleeve.)

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