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Stitch dropped in the same area ?

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28 comments

  • Robert Ingemarsson

    From out experience on knitting scarves on the machine, this is probably to do with tension?

    How do you have the tension set?

     

     

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  • plasmatopia

    I agree with Robert, but even with the yarn tension settings between the cone and feeder optimized, I have also encountered problems with yarn breakage.  Based on what I see in your photo, I might play around with increasing stitch size a bit and/or reducing the roll setting.  When doing jacquard, the default roll settings may be high. At least in early versions of the compiler, it didn't take into account that there were multiple colors per row and the amount of total roll per row was too much.

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    For reference, this is what we use (and it works perfectly all the time).

    • 440 Roll,
    • Stitch Size 7 on the front and
    • Stitch Size 6 on the back

    This works perfectly for both 2 colour and 5 colour knits.

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  • plasmatopia

    Another question would be is whether the problem is yarn breakage or dropped stitches?  

    Also, another suggestion would be to set the machine speed to a low value (<100?) for those few rows where the holes are forming, and then watch the machine carefully while it knits in super slomo.  That may help see what is going wrong.  (I've also had experiences where lower speeds help reduce both broken yarn incidences and dropped stitches.)

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  • Gerard Rubio

    It seems the yarn is breaking with the jacquard passes. That could be due to the yarn being a bit stiff or the stitch size a bit too small. For the first, releasing some tension from the tensioner springs and/or waxing the yarn could help. For the latter, could you try that scarf with a stitch size one point larger? 

    It is likely the edges are curling a bit due to too much takedown by the rollers. As Plasmatopia suggested, I would reduce that a bit.

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Looking at your file, you are knitting on stitch size 4 / 4

    We run all our scarves  on 7 / 6 (Front / Back).  This allows the back to pull in slightly compared to the front.

    We originally knitted at 4/4 and our scarves were so tight they broke and were very 'tight' to the touch...

    Tim

     

     

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  • D3VUR

    Thank you everyone ! You were correct, changing 6/6 and 7/6 seemed to helped a lot!

    The sides some places still not %100 perfectly closed but it's better than before! 

     

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  • D3VUR

    oh forgot to add some gnarly kniterate picture... perhaps I forgot to cut supportive thread in time and got fabric rolled back into roller >_< Somehow skipped sensor (usually I get roller notification) and kept going 

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Hi thats great news about the stitch size - 4 would have just been too tight and would not have felt nice.

    From our experience, the issue with the edges will be the tension, probably on the left of the machine.

    What tension do you have set on the left?

    With regards to the knit rolling up - this should not occur as the roller sensor should pick this up.  We have also had that a couple of times, and I need to provide some information to Gerard Rubio as we think the sensors may not be aligned propertly.

    Gerard Rubio is it worth starting a new thread on this maybe?

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  • Gerard Rubio

    Great to see scarves are coming out much nicer. As Robert pointed, check the yarn tensioner on the left of the machine. Try increasing the yarn tension by moving the pink sliders downwards a bit.

    Robert Ingemarsson the roller sensor sometimes not detecting yarn is something we've been working on the re-designed machine so it becomes 100% reliable. Could you provide information via support@kniterate.com? Then we can distill the information to share it with the community.

    Thanks!

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Gerard Rubio will get that info to you once we have a break in manufacture - Still needing to knit 10 scarves a day to keep up with demand..

    Maybe we need a second machine!!!!

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  • Heidi Hennessy

    I am able to get a nice even fabric on the body of my jacquard watch. But during the first jacquard pass the yarn breaks. It only breaks on the first pass. The rest of the swatch knits fine. As per Gerard Rubio's suggestion above - should I change the tensioner spring to be looser on just the first row of jacquard, then change it back to where it was for the body? I tried changing the tensioner springs looser for the entire swatch and it drops the end sts on the body of the fabric so I know it was correct where I had it before but I am hoping to find a solution for that first row. Alternatively, should I try that first jacquard pass with a larger stitch size? I am knitting these swatches in cashmere and it's eating into my profits the more swatches I have to make to keep dialing this in!

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Hi - if you send across the kcode will take a look and recommend how to fix based on what we know from knitting many garment - we can and run the start on our machine as well to check all works

    Info at ecoknitware dot com

    Tim & Robert

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    You will find you probably need to add a new row are the beginning with some racking to stabilise the row..

    Will look at your file and then confirm :)

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  • OJ

    Heidi Hennessy I've started reducing the take down on the cast-on row and the circular that follows to prevent the breakage that I would sometimes get on my first row. My roll distance for the cast-on (zigzag) is now between 350 and 400 and the next two rows (tubular) are 200 each. Your take down will depend on your yarn weight and stitch size, but reducing takedown on that first row really helped with the yarn I was using. If I need to transfer after the circular I reduce the take down even more on the tubular.

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Adding another row with rack 0.5 before staring works as well. We went through all this with jipke over a year ago - bugs are raised for either documentation or bindon. Changes but once you know what to do every knit works. We knit 10 garments a day without any dropped stitches

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  • Command knitwear

    Robert Ingemarsson can you elaborate on the racking suggestion? Are you saying to add a 0.5 rack after the bind on is complete, then go back to 0.0, then knit in the draw-cord and then do the setup row (zigzag) and circular rows? When exactly should it be racked and why does this help? Thanks!

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  • Heidi Hennessy

    Thanks OJ for the take down tip. I reduced the take down on the zigzag and the circular rows and my bind on is now beautiful. yay! I also learned that I have to run the speed at 350 max on the entire project so as not to break the cashmere yarn. I feel so accomplished finally! 

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  • Heidi Hennessy

    Thanks Robert Ingemarsson for the offer to send the kcode for you to look at. When I run into any more troubles, I'll take up your offer. 

     

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Hi

     

    As discussed, this is our bindon and bind off settings which work 100% of the time.

    BINDOFF

    BINDON

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  • OJ

    Heidi Hennessy Glad it worked for you!

    Robert Ingemarsson Interesting to see your bind-off sequence. Thank you for posting it. What roll distance and speed are you using (behind the tooltip)?

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Hi - This was worked through with the kniterate over a year ago after many failed bindons

    We have used this bindon in production over 500 times with zero failures.

    The extra row which is knitted when racked gives stability I believe...

     

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  • plasmatopia

    Thanks, Robert Ingemarsson, for the great bind on tip!! It is genius!  Knitting a row on the front bed after the zigzag row while still racked releases those stitches from the needles.  I can see how that would greatly reduce the strain on the yarn when the back bed is subsequently racked back to the home position.  I have also experienced broken yarn during bind on sometimes and will use this technique from now on

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  • OJ

    Robert Ingemarsson I will definitely give this cast-on a go. I've cast on in the past with the zigzag and both parts of the circular rows racked to the half-pitch position, but never just the first part of the circular racked. Seems as if it might be the perfect balance between the two methods! Thanks!

    About your bind-off, do you still make adjustments to the roll distance as you move across the row? 

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Let us know how you get on - it’s works for us and has fixed other people issues as well.

    For the bind off. - yes we change the roll as we go down the bindoff

    Without doing this you either end up with a very stretched knit or dropped stitches. - it’s a fine ball engine act that I think we have sorted for our knits but I am sure every knit and yarn needs it’s own adjustments

    Tim

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  • OJ

    Fortunately, I haven't had any issues with the cast-on generated from the app. I tweak the take down when necessary depending on my yarn. But since I do different types of stitch patterns with a few different yarns, I like to have as many cast-on sequences in my toolkit as possible. :)

    Here's the cast-on I'm currently using for a 1x1 rib. It avoids the transfers you would need for a 1x1 rib if you did a full needle rib cast-on. This way the bottom edge is less bulky. It's a standard cast-on for hand machines. After completing the 1x1 rib you can easily transfer for a jersey fabric. Settings are for cotton NM 6.8. 

     

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  • Robert Ingemarsson

    Thank you for sharing - will try thins next time we are doing a 1-1 plain rib :) oh for the shared template system Allowing us to share patterns etc

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